PRESS

PRESS


Charleston City Paper, March 2017

Charleston City Paper, March 2017

Meyer Vogl Gallery hosts inaugural abstract show, "RAW"

Altman, who left the world of art for 25 years to pursue a successful career as a realtor, has returned, and with a fury. "My risk-taking is at an all time high," she laughs, "I only want to tackle something if it's a challenge." The artist, who loves German expressionism, often uses collage and the juxtaposition of "unlike things" in her pieces, sometimes creating three different works that she paints over, "many times I'll decide 'well, I learned a lot, but this is not where I want to be,' and that comes out in the final painting." 

Altman says she has had arthritis since her 20s, but she's never let that stop her from painting. "When my friends lament, oh I'm sore, I'm hurting, I tell them well, I'm celebrating." Altman's abstract work for RAW taps into this celebratory attitude, "I've become more comfortable with color, and you see that in my new pieces. I still have perspective, angle, juxtaposition, but there's a lot more frivolity, playfulness. It's raw in terms of being emotionally honest. When people see it I don't need for them to understand something about me, I hope they will understand something about themselves."

 

The Art Mag, April 2017

The Art Mag, April 2017

The Home of an Artist with No Rules

“Keep your eyes wide open…and, remember, there are no rules.”

Susan Altman has been reminding herself of these two philosophies ever since she started painting again, after a 25-year pause. And though she says there are guidelines that she taps into when she’s creating art, take one look around her Mt. Pleasant home, and it’s clear that she also calls upon them when collecting art.

 

The Post and Courier, May 2016

The Post and Courier, May 2016

Worlds together 2 artists years apart discover common ground through painting class at C of C

What happens when a young former ocean lifeguard and an older real estate agent meet in studio art class at the College of Charleston? What happens when they discover a certain shared aesthetic affinity, a similar work ethic, a like-minded willingness to make purposeful mistakes, an affection for big brushes and palette knives, a desire to delve deep into the emotions that underlie a work of art?

They team up and organize a pop-up exhibition.